Destiny Companion app for iPhone and iPad released ahead of Thursday’s beta test

Game developer Bungie has released the Destiny Companion app for the iPhone and iPad, one day away from the start of the beta test for the long awaited sci-fi first person shooter.

The app will provide a lot of second screen information for players of the game, which is being made by the team originally responsible for the popular Halo series. The Destiny Companion’s description says:

Inspect your Guardian, analyze player stats, and compare your Grimoire score. Keep in touch with your friends in the Bungie Community via forums, groups, or private messaging and track them down on the PlayStation Network or Xbox LIVE. And, receive the latest news and updates about Destiny.

The beta test for Destiny begins tomorrow for Sony PlayStation 3 and 4 owners, with Xbox 360 and Xbox One gamers joining in on July 23. The beta will end on July 26, less than two months before the full version of Destiny is released September 9.

Are you planning to participate in the Destiny beta test and if so will you also be using the Companion app?

Destiny Companion – Download for free on iTunes



Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/pOm9iMpXmM8/story01.htm
Tags: eastbay   Edward Snowden   Teemu Selanne   Alibaba   Donald Sterling comments  

Leave a comment

Debug 42: Swift roundtable

Debug is a casual, conversational interview show featuring the best developers in the business about the amazing apps they make and why and how they make them. On this episode Natalia Berdys of Foodoo Kitchen, Don Melton, former director of internet technology at Apple, and Brent Simmons of Vesper join Guy and Rene to talk about Swift, its future, Sprite Kit, and more!

Support Debug: Go to podsurvey.com/debug to take our survey and get a chance to win a $100 Amazon Gift Card. Go to lynda.com/debug to start your 7-day free trial. Go to getharvest.com and use offer code DEBUG by August 1st to receive 50% off your first month.

Show notes

Panel

Feedback

Question, comment, recommendation, or something you want us to follow up on for the next show?

Email us at debug@mobilenations.com or leave a comment below.



Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/mfebuojvUvQ/story01.htm
Category: Johnny Manziel   Australia vs Spain   falling skies   Jerramy Stevens   clayton kershaw  

Leave a comment

Chrome for iOS now supports browser-based Chromecasting

Chrome for iPhone and iPad is getting a small update today that allows supporting mobile sites to beam the site to the big screen over Chromecast. This may be redundant if you’ve got an Apple TV and AirPlay mirroring on the go, but options are always nice.

Finding Chromecast-enabled sites are pretty tricky, but Chrome is a solid browser, and if you’re not using it already on your iPhone or iPad, you should really consider giving it a go. Chromecast is also particularly awesome, and if you’ve got a spare HDMI port on the back of your TV, it’s worth picking up at that price.

Source: Google



Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/75JG4d_XaTw/story01.htm
Category: chris brown   Edge Of Tomorrow  

Leave a comment

The Typhoon looks like a cool futuristic fighter with its new top tanks

The Typhoon looks like a cool futuristic fighter with its new top tanks

This picture—taken by airplane photographer Luigi Sani—shows a weird smooth hump on the central fuselage of an Eurofighter Typhoon. It’s one of its two new top Conformal Fuel Tanks, designed to further extend its range. They are now being tested by BAE Systems in wind tunnels.

Read more…








Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/YZxWp3swxrk/+caseychan
Category: Ebola   Eviscerated   bonnaroo   Brett Rossi   jimmy fallon  

Leave a comment

13 Unexpected Sources of Energy that Could Save the World

13 Unexpected Sources of Energy that Could Save the World

If humans are going to keep living in the style to which we’re accustomed, we need to find alternatives for fossil fuels. Partly that’s because we need to reduce pollution — and partly because those fossil fuels are going to run out. But alternative forms of energy may look a lot weirder than you think.

Read more…


    

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/MLzY4d21qQ4/@gmanaugh
Tags: tesla   kentucky basketball   first day of spring   earthquake   the bachelor  

Leave a comment

iFixit’s iPad mini with Retina Display teardown reveals huge battery, unicorn dust

iFixit's iPad mini with Retina Display teardown reveals huge battery, unicorn dust

iFixit wasted no time after yesterday’s surprise launch of the iPad mini with Retina Display to get their hands on one and tear it apart to see how it’s built. The results are in.

iFixit discovered that the iPad mini’s Retina Display is made by LG, working at a higher pixel density (326 pixels per inch) than the bigger iPad Air. A 24.3 watt per hour battery is inside, a 50 percent increase in juice-carrying capacity compared to the “standard” iPad mini. The central brain of the iPad mini is an Apple A7 processor clocked at 1.3 GHz – the same speed as the iPhone 5s, just a skosh slower than the iPad Air.

Perhaps predictably, given Apple designs of late, iFixit has given the new iPad mini a very low repairability score – 2 out of 10. Red marks against the iPad mini include excessive use of adhesive, hidden screws, and a soldered Lightning connector. On the flip side, the breakdown mavens were happy that the LCD and glass aren’t fused together, which should simply screen replacement, and the absence of solder on the battery, making that easier to replace, as well.

Is the iPad mini with Retina Display’s repairability a factor in your decision to get one? Or do you leave the tinkering to the experts? Let me know what you think in the comments.

Source: iFixit

Retina iPad mini

Retina iPad mini
The world’s most popular tiny tablet goes Retina. Features include:

Complete preview >

Released
November 12, 2013

Alternatives
iPad Air, iPad 2

Replacements
iPad Mini 3
Fall, 2014

Resources
Buyers guide
Help forum


    







Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/_KKY9FwkQx4/story01.htm
Similar Articles: Saola   Agents of SHIELD   Claire Danes   aaron hernandez   twerk  

Leave a comment

FCC Chairman: I Want Carriers to Allow Phone Unlocking

FCC Chairman: I Want Carriers to Allow Phone Unlocking

The newly crowned chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Tom Wheeler, is clearly an ambitious man: he’s on a crusade to get carriers to allow phone unlocking.

Read more…


    







Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/2kQLsAJSkGY/the-new-fcc-chairman-wants-carriers-to-allow-phone-unlo-1465010676
Tags: Dakota Johnson   eminem   Canelo Vs Mayweather   blobfish   Miley Cyrus Vma 2013  

Leave a comment

Nature’s glowing slime: Scientists peek into hidden sea worm’s light

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

13-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California – San Diego


Clouds of bioluminescent mucus — emitted by a marine worm that lives in a cocoon-like habitat — is linked to a common vitamin

Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues are unraveling the mechanisms behind a little-known marine worm that produces a dazzling bioluminescent display in the form of puffs of blue light released into seawater.

Found around the world in muddy environments, from shallow bays to deeper canyons, the light produced by the Chaetopterus marine wormcommonly known as the “parchment tube worm” due to the opaque, cocoon-like cylinders where it makes its homeis secreted as a slimy bioluminescent mucus.

The mucus, which the worms are able to secrete out of any part of their body, hasn’t been studied by scientists in more than 50 years. But two recent studies have helped reignite the quest to decode the inner workings of the worm’s bioluminescence.

In one study, published in the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Scripps Associate Research Scientist Dimitri Deheyn and his colleagues at Georgetown University describe details of Chaetopterus‘s light production as never before. Through data derived from experiments conducted inside Scripps Oceanography’s Experimental Aquarium, the researchers characterized specific features of the worm’s light, tracing back its generation to a specific “photoprotein” tied to bioluminescence.

“The fact that the light is produced as a long glow without direct oxygen consumption is attractive for a range of future biotechnological applications,” added Deheyn, whose current work focuses on identifying the specific protein(s) involved in the light production.

The present study, however, focused on the general biochemistry and optical properties of the light production. “We have shown that the mucus produces a long-lasting glow of blue light, which is unique for this environment where bioluminescence is usually produced as short-lived flashes of light in the green spectrum, especially for benthic (seafloor) species,” said Deheyn, who added that green travels farthest and is therefore the easiest to detect in shallow coastal environments.

As for the light’s ecological function, the researchers speculate that the luminous mucus may serve as a trap to attract prey, a deterrent to ward off certain unwelcome guests into the worm’s living areas (the glowing mucus could stick to an intruder, making it more visible to its own predators), or possibly serve as a substance to build the worms’ flaky, tube-shaped homes.

The blue color makes it intriguing and difficult to reconcile with a visual function for shallow animals only.

“However, one can imagine that blue light would work better if the predator is a fish coming from greater depths, or for specific predators for which we still don’t know the visual sensitivity,” concluded Deheyn.

In a separate study, Deheyn and his colleagues at Connecticut College found that riboflavin, known as vitamin B2 and used widely as a dietary supplement, is a key source of the light production. The study appearing in Photochemistry and Photobiology focused on worms collected by Scripps Marine Collector and Technician Phil Zerofski in the La Jolla submarine canyon off the coast of San Diego, California.

The research revealed riboflavin as the major fluorescent compound in all extracts of the worm’s luminescent material, including the glowing slime. Although more investigation is needed, the authors hypothesize that a derivative of riboflavin serves as the emitting force in the worm’s light-production process.

The authors note that the worms are not able to produce riboflavin on their ownonly plants and microbes cantherefore the worms must acquire the vitamin through a food source, the same way humans do.

“We have shown that the bioluminescent light production involves riboflavin, which is key because it means that the worm is relying on an external source,” said Deheyn. “We suggest the light production depends on the worm’s diet, yet it could also involve a symbiosis with bacteria (possibly living in the tube) to provide the riboflavin.”

Further investigations are targeting intricacies of the chemical reactions behind the light production and methods to synthesize the light production in the laboratory.

###

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research’s Natural Materials, Systems, and Extremophiles Program and the Hans & Ella McCollum ’21 Vahlteich Endowment supported the research.


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

13-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California – San Diego


Clouds of bioluminescent mucus — emitted by a marine worm that lives in a cocoon-like habitat — is linked to a common vitamin

Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues are unraveling the mechanisms behind a little-known marine worm that produces a dazzling bioluminescent display in the form of puffs of blue light released into seawater.

Found around the world in muddy environments, from shallow bays to deeper canyons, the light produced by the Chaetopterus marine wormcommonly known as the “parchment tube worm” due to the opaque, cocoon-like cylinders where it makes its homeis secreted as a slimy bioluminescent mucus.

The mucus, which the worms are able to secrete out of any part of their body, hasn’t been studied by scientists in more than 50 years. But two recent studies have helped reignite the quest to decode the inner workings of the worm’s bioluminescence.

In one study, published in the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Scripps Associate Research Scientist Dimitri Deheyn and his colleagues at Georgetown University describe details of Chaetopterus‘s light production as never before. Through data derived from experiments conducted inside Scripps Oceanography’s Experimental Aquarium, the researchers characterized specific features of the worm’s light, tracing back its generation to a specific “photoprotein” tied to bioluminescence.

“The fact that the light is produced as a long glow without direct oxygen consumption is attractive for a range of future biotechnological applications,” added Deheyn, whose current work focuses on identifying the specific protein(s) involved in the light production.

The present study, however, focused on the general biochemistry and optical properties of the light production. “We have shown that the mucus produces a long-lasting glow of blue light, which is unique for this environment where bioluminescence is usually produced as short-lived flashes of light in the green spectrum, especially for benthic (seafloor) species,” said Deheyn, who added that green travels farthest and is therefore the easiest to detect in shallow coastal environments.

As for the light’s ecological function, the researchers speculate that the luminous mucus may serve as a trap to attract prey, a deterrent to ward off certain unwelcome guests into the worm’s living areas (the glowing mucus could stick to an intruder, making it more visible to its own predators), or possibly serve as a substance to build the worms’ flaky, tube-shaped homes.

The blue color makes it intriguing and difficult to reconcile with a visual function for shallow animals only.

“However, one can imagine that blue light would work better if the predator is a fish coming from greater depths, or for specific predators for which we still don’t know the visual sensitivity,” concluded Deheyn.

In a separate study, Deheyn and his colleagues at Connecticut College found that riboflavin, known as vitamin B2 and used widely as a dietary supplement, is a key source of the light production. The study appearing in Photochemistry and Photobiology focused on worms collected by Scripps Marine Collector and Technician Phil Zerofski in the La Jolla submarine canyon off the coast of San Diego, California.

The research revealed riboflavin as the major fluorescent compound in all extracts of the worm’s luminescent material, including the glowing slime. Although more investigation is needed, the authors hypothesize that a derivative of riboflavin serves as the emitting force in the worm’s light-production process.

The authors note that the worms are not able to produce riboflavin on their ownonly plants and microbes cantherefore the worms must acquire the vitamin through a food source, the same way humans do.

“We have shown that the bioluminescent light production involves riboflavin, which is key because it means that the worm is relying on an external source,” said Deheyn. “We suggest the light production depends on the worm’s diet, yet it could also involve a symbiosis with bacteria (possibly living in the tube) to provide the riboflavin.”

Further investigations are targeting intricacies of the chemical reactions behind the light production and methods to synthesize the light production in the laboratory.

###

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research’s Natural Materials, Systems, and Extremophiles Program and the Hans & Ella McCollum ’21 Vahlteich Endowment supported the research.


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.


Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uoc–ngs111313.php
Tags: What Would I Say   Lake Natron   Jonathan Ferrell   floyd mayweather   Ezra Is A  

Leave a comment

Choosing reality: why sci-fi author David Gerrold doesn’t want a flying car

“I think we built the right future,” declares David Gerrold on Expand NY’s stage. “If it’s a choice between the flying car or the internet, tablets and smartphones, I’ll take what we’ve got.” It’s almost a shocking statement, considering the choice: Gerrold had a hand in writing episodes of The …

Source: http://feeds.engadget.com/~r/weblogsinc/engadget/~3/bK9qjkx6yWU/
Similar Articles: redskins   steve bartman   Mexico vs Panama   twerking   Cal Worthington  

Leave a comment

Noninvasive Macbook Storage Expansion, Game Of Thrones [Deals]


Noninvasive Macbook Storage Expansion, Game Of Thrones [Deals]

If the SSD in your MacBook Air or MacBook Pro is squeezed for space, this clever device sits nearly flush in your SD card slot and adds 128GB of extra storage. Today’s $98 price is over $20 less than the previous low. There’s also a cheaper 64 GB version, but it’s not on sale.

Read more…


    







Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/seOKpddSxHk/a-great-airplay-speaker-for-40-pny-storedge-game-of-1460211030
Similar Articles: channing tatum   Captain Phillips   Brian Hoyer   serena williams   grandparents day  

Leave a comment